Ryan Lester #FeaturedArtistFriday 10.26.18

Ryan Lester is this weeks featured artist. Ryan is one of the best lyricists That I have encountered. His music tells stories, While digging deep into the psyche of his listeners. His music is truly, influenced by the roots of music. You can tell from his lyrics that he has done a lot of traveling, and seen a lot of things.

I don’t usually post the links to Artist channels, but after hearing this song I felt it was worth sharing it in its entirety. Give this song a listen, and enjoy Ryan’s interview!

https://www.facebook.com/100000490583351/posts/2623594274333566/

1. What’s your name(s)? How old Are you? Married? Kids?

Where are you from? Where did you grow up? My Name is Ryan Lester, I’m 25, No kids or marriages yet, and I was an army brat so I grew up in a lot of places (Germany, Georgia, Kentucky, El Paso, Texas, Belgium, West Virginia, Killeen, Texas, Pennsylvania, and now Houston, Texas).

2.  When/how were you introduced to music?

Music was omnipresent in my life growing up. Most of my extended family were bluegrass musicians but also played gospel, folk, blues, country, and, well, roots music. So I don’t remember being introduced to music. It was always there, like a second language.

3.  What were you doing before pursuing your music as a career?

I’ve being pursuing music as a career with varying degrees of success since I was 15 but along the way I’ve worked different jobs here and there, mostly mechanical work. I guess you could say I’m a blue-collard guy.

4.  What made you decide to pursue your music career?

Music is just all I’ve ever known or loved. I’ve been writing songs since I was 10 and so it just seems natural to do.

On Your Music:

1.  Who are some of your biggest influences, or your musical heroes?

Nowadays it’s people like Leonard Cohen, Jason Isbell, Cory Branan , Townes Van Zandt, Blaze Foley, John Prine, Conor Oberst, Iris DeMent, and a girl I played a few shows with in Philly named Shannen Moser just put out a great record that has been on repeat.

2.  Do you write your own music? Collaborate with others?  Do you have a preference between the two?

I write all of my own music but I’ve collaborated on songs with other people over the years in various bands and projects. I think I prefer writing alone because I enjoy the isolation.

3.  What kinds of things do you write about?  What inspires you?

I write about life and every emotion felt Therein. I write about myself but I also write about characters I’ve created. I seem to enjoy narratives where the character is in a very particular crisis and can’t seem to escape it. I’m inspired by everything around me. I love collecting conversations.

4.  How would you describe your style of music?

I think I’d say it’s very lyrically dense Folk Rock, Singer-Songwriter, Alternative Country, Americana, and a little flare of indie and blues all mixed together with the full range of human emotions and a guitar.

5.  Do you have people that play with you?  Do you have a band?

I used to have more folks play live with me but I’ve solo for a little while now. I’d like to get another band together in the near future though!

6.  Do you produce your own music, or do you have a studio that works with you?

I’ve produced all of my own music since I was 12 and I would mess around on my rascal 4-track. It’s basically the same thing now but with a lot better equipment and a little more skill.

7.  How can people listen to or purchase your music, and how could they learn about shows coming up, and other news concerning your music?

Well, I just put out a single called “Worry Lines” and that’s up on all major music distributors (Apple Music, Spotify, Youtube, Amazon, etc…) , you can go to my bandcamp which is ryanlester.bandcamp.com for show information, and the only real news I have is that I’m playing shows and recording a full length LP that should be out in 2019! So be on the lookout for that.

8. Any closing remarks that you would like to share with your supporters/listeners?

Well first I’d like to thank anyone that listens, supports, buys the music, or comes to shows. YOU are what keeps the train rolling and I am incredibly grateful that you exist. I’d also like to thank my friends and family for sticking by me through thick and thin. And lastly, I’d like to thank my wonderful, beautiful, and loving girlfriend Elizabeth Cliburn for being so supportive. She has been an irreplaceable source of stability for me and I’m truly thankful for that.

Nathan Mongol Wells #FeaturedArtistFriday 9.14.18

This weeks featured artist, has a very creative ability. His music could be classified in many different ways, but his uniqueness is what makes his music so good. True roots music, does not necessarily have to be traditional, but real. Nathan Mongol Wells takes a real approach to music in what he calls “Outlaw Country Garage Rock”.

We love this interview, because Nathan goes into explicit detail about his experience in life, music, and even different careers that he has been apart of. Music is an expression of humanity, and Nathan captures it well. Be sure to look him up, and subscribe to he blog for more artists like him!

Enjoy!

1. What’s your name? How old Are you? Married? Kids? Where are you from? Where did you grow up?

– My name is Nathan Mongol Wells. I’m 26, married, no kids, but a very sweet yellow lab named Emmylou (yes, after Emmylou Harris!) I’m from Dallas, TX. It’s been home for the past 15 years, so I did a lot of growing up here, but before that my family lived in Alabama, Virginia, and Kuwait City, actually, for two years. We traveled a lot, and the things I was able to see and places and cultures I have been able to experience influence my music a good deal.

2.  When/how were you introduced to music?

– My mother sings, and was in a Gospel band when I was a child, so gospel singers and church music formed a lot of my early foundation. My dad was a fan of late-70s early-80s rock, so I inherited the Clash and Talking Heads from him. In 5th grade, they forced me into starting Spanish classical guitar lessons. Then, in 8th grade, I discovered Green Day, and asked for an electric guitar (a Fender Stratocaster) for my birthday. Needless to say, I got it, and nothing was the same since. From Green Day I found the Strokes and the Velvet Underground, “Walk the Line” introduced me to Johnny Cash, my grandparents supplied Hank Williams Sr. records that I completely absorbed, a friend introduced me to Tom Waits, which led to an investigation of all roots music, where I found the Blues in Muddy Waters and especially Howlin’ Wolf, and got further into country with Hayes Carll via SXM radio, and on we go…

3.  What were you doing before pursuing your music as a career?

– I graduated with a degree in architecture. I’ve always had a love for buildings, design, and art. When I was younger I wanted to be an illustrator, before I was introduced to the guitar. So that has fed a lot of my other interests. As an extension of architecture, for my first year out of school I worked construction. Last year I had the pleasure of teaching 7th grade math. I’ve driven buses, worked retail, and waited tables. All of it informs my music, especially architecture, which I feel is in some ways the ultimate art form. It’s art that we inhabit and interact with, art that affects our daily lives. A lot of what I write about starts with buildings I see and places I visit and the people that reside in them.

4.  What made you decide to pursue your music career?

– It is something that grew from a simple hobby to one of the greatest loves of my life. I started in high school, writing with friends and slowly learning the trade on small stages and in battles of the bands. I went to college, loving music and my band but understanding it could never be a sure thing, so I tried to pursue something that would be more conducive to life. Over those years, it became more and more clear that my time offstage or away from a guitar was not satisfying in the way that making music was. I felt that if I didn’t give it an honest try I’d never forgive myself. Thankfully, my wife Courtney is a big support. She’s helped me do more than I ever could have on my own. We’re figuring it out together (while she pursues her own dreams, of course!)

On Your Music:

1.  Who are some of your biggest influences, or your musical heroes?

– The first and most important answer will always be Tom Waits! When I heard his music it transformed what I knew music could be. Pointed me in the direction everything else has followed. I love all the greats, particularly Hank Sr., Waylon, and Willie, and more modern writers like Sturgill Simpson, Fred Eaglesmith and Hayes Carll, who showed me how country could be relevant today. Honestly, a few groups on my heaviest rotation are from farther afield, Fela Kuti, Primus, and Nine Inch Nails. Most recently, I’ve really been digging on the Deslondes.

2.  Do you write your own music? Collaborate with others?  Do you have a preference between the two?

– I write my own, most of the time on my own. Cowriting is something I’ve only done a handful of times, and it’s new territory for me. I’m interested in doing more of it, however! I can see the value. Writing usually happens when I’m home alone and have the freedom to try things out. I have probably a thousand notes in my phone and on my computer in varying states of completion that I can sit down and work through. As far as collaborations, in May I finished my latest solo project, the Matchstick Singles, which was all about collaboration! I released song a week, one at a time, over twelve weeks. To bring each track to fruition, I partnered with different local musicians, taking the songs places they never would have been otherwise. Each track also had a different, specific album cover, created or chosen by artists both local and national. It was really, really cool and a lot of work. I’m proud of how it turned out.

3.  What kinds of things do you write about?  What inspires you?

– If I tried to sum it up, I guess it’s human stories that I enjoy most. I always try and draw from personal experience to fill in details, really cover a subject, so over the course of the song you should get a complete picture… a feel for the room, so to speak. I like creepy things, aliens, ghosts, conspiracies. I also feel like rural stories are interesting ones to tell. People and places on the fringe. But it all comes down to conveying feelings! Lately my songs have been fairly personal.

4.  How would you describe your style of music?

– I always say country-ish, haha. It starts with country, folk, and blues, and branches outwards. I don’t want to be a traditionalist. I want to push those boundaries when I can, and when it makes sense to. I’m not the most experimental guy, but I do think blending genres comes kind of naturally and I never wanna hem things in too much. With my band Ottoman Turks, we’ve come up with the term “outlaw country garage rock” that I feel nails it down pretty well. As for Nathan Mongol Wells, I’m still figuring that out. I like y’all’s claim on “roots music.” That’s a good summation.

5.  Do you have people that play with you?  Do you have a band?

– Yes! The aforementioned Ottoman Turks was started as a solo project in high school, and grew over the years to include Billy Law on bass, Paul Hinojo on drums, and Joshua Ray Walker on lead guitar. It’s been a long road, but over all this time we’ve really defined our sound. I also play with Joshua Ray Walker in an appalachian-folk-inspired duo we call Devil’s Sooty Brother. And recently I’ve gathered together some guys to back my solo stuff, and I’m really excited about it. We have Ryan Muller on drums, Charlie J. Memphis on bass, and Marco Bartolomei on pedal steel (with Joshua Ray Walker filling in on lead when he’s not working on his own excellent solo project)!

6.  Do you produce your own music, or do you have a studio that works with you?

– Everything I’ve released under Nathan Mongol Wells I’ve recorded myself, with a single condenser mic, at home or friends’ homes or elsewhere. It’s both freeing and limiting in a way that produces stuff I couldn’t do in a studio. I love having the freedom to try whatever I want without fear of criticism or time constraints. That being said, I plan to get into the studio soon for a true full length. It’s very difficult to get the best recording possible without having a seasoned producer at the helm. I’m looking forward to finding out how that turns out. Lately I’ve been talking with a great local label. We’ll see what happens.

7.  How can people listen to or purchase your music, and how could they learn about shows coming up, and other news concerning your music?

Instagram or Facebook are the best ways to keep up with everything! I’m very active on Instagram under @mongolwells. As far as hearing/purchasing my music, everything I do, I use Bandcamp. It’s a super transparent, user- and artist- friendly platform that’s proven successful year after year. We put Ottoman Turks’ first recording up there in 2011 and I’ve used it since. Go to mongolwells.bandcamp.com to hear to my most recent project, the Matchstick Singles. Ottoman Turks’ releases can be found on ottomanturks.bandcamp.com or on Spotify and all the other digital outlets. And you can find videos, merch, and links to everything on my website, mongolwells.com!

8. Any closing remarks that you would like to share with your supporters/listeners?

– Oh, Lord. I’ve said it a thousand times, but I appreciate anyone that listens or comes to shows more than they could ever know. I would play music if I was the last person on earth, but it’s so much more valuable when you get to share it and collaborate and enjoy it all together. What I do is so enhanced by the people that listen. It’s an industry that couldn’t exist without that. So thanks to anyone that comes out, or listens online, or generally supports artists and musicians!

Tim Combs #FeaturedArtistFriday 8.31.2018

This week we are featuring a fun and creative artist who puts his life-long story-telling ability to work.  You can hear in his lyrics, a life lived working hard, and feeling deep emotion about his work, and the people around him.  Like many of his heroes, Tim definitely has a story to tell, and he does it in an elegant way that we working class can relate to.  You can find his music on any streaming service, and he likes to get to know his listeners so be sure to follow him on Instagram and Facebook.
(Follow this link for one of his songs on YouTube)
Here is his interview.

Background:

 
1. What’s your name(s)? How old Are you? Married? Kids? Where are you from? Where did you grow up?
My name is Tim Combs. I’m 53 yrs old for a few more weeks. I am married. I have four kids ages 33 25 24 and 14. I’m from Hamilton Ohio. A city north of Cincinnati and now live in Monroe Ohio.
 
2.  When/how were you introduced to music?
I got into music as a fan at a very young age loving people like Johnny Cash, Buck Owens and Charlie Pride. As I got older I got into Alice Cooper Kiss Rush Ted Nugent, Foghat, all of the classic rock. The first time I heard Van Halen, I was totally blown away. Then my taste started changing and I really got into bands like U2 and The Cure. Nowadays, I spend a lot of time listening to acts like Josh Ritter and DBT.
 
3.  What were you doing before pursuing your music as a career? What made you decide to pursue your music career?
I still have a day job but have always wanted to be a touring musician and put much effort into my songwriting hoping that eventually someone would take notice. Now that I have released Hazard Coal I’m hoping this could help lead to making that dream a reality. I think the songs are strong.
 
On Your Music:
 
1.  Who are some of your biggest influences, or your musical heroes?
Some of my biggest influences are the classic storytellers like Steve Earle, Townes and also the great writings of Paul Westerburg and Bob Dylan have inspired me.
 
2.  Do you write your own music? Collaborate with others?  Do you have a preference between the two?
I write my own music. I haven’t participated in collaboration. I’m not sure I’d be very good at it.
 
3.  What kinds of things do you write about?  What inspires you? 
I write about anything and everything. There is inspiration everywhere. We all have a story to tell.
 
4.  How would you describe your style of music?
Acoustic Americana folk rock country blues.
 
5.  Do you have people that play with you?  Do you have a band?
I work with a band occasionally but mostly play by myself.
 
6.  Do you produce your own music, or do you have a studio that works with you?
I have been working with Zach Gabbard (Buffalo Killers) He and I co-produced Hazard Coal. It was recorded mostly live at his studio Howler Hills Farm.
 
7.  How can people listen to or purchase your music, and how could they learn about shows coming up, and other news concerning your music?
Hazard Coal can be found on iTunes Amazon and most other online stores and streaming services. You can follow my Facebook page to see what I’m up to. That’s timcombsmusic@facebook.com.
 
8. Any closing remarks that you would like to share with your supporters/listeners?
I would like to say that if someone takes the time out of their busy schedule to listen to a couple or even one of my songs it really means a lot to me. I would ask that if you like it drop me a line and maybe share it with your friends.

Garrett Wheeler #featuredartistfriday 8.24.18

This week, we’re excited to feature our youngest artist yet.  Garrett is just 16.  But don’t let his age fool you, he’s genuine, sincere, and authentic.  He has already lived a good deal of life on the road, and has experienced difficulty that many people can probably relate with.  He’s passionate, driven, and talented.  He (like many other artists on this page) is working on a new album, and we expect big things from him.  Enjoy this interview, but more importantly, go check out his music!

Background:

1. What’s your name(s)? How old Are you? Married? Kids? Where are you from? Where did you grow up?

My name is Garrett Wheeler, I’m 16 years old & I’m from Atlanta, GA

2. When/how were you introduced to music?

I’ve been around music as long as I can remember. My mom was a singer when she was younger, so growing up I would always do kareoke in whatever bar we were in that night.

3. What were you doing before pursuing your music as a career?

I used to do a little bit of modeling & acting from when I was about 4-12, but other than that nothing really. My first “real” job was playing Wednesday & Sunday nights at the American Legion.

4. What made you decide to pursue your music career?

After a couple months of doing the American Legion gig, one of the people there to see me sent a video of one of my songs to someone she knew, who just happened to be a music producer. He reached out & wanted me to come to the studio one day, & when I came he said he wanted to produce a couple singles with me. That was probably the turning point that made me believe I could turn this into something more.

On Your Music:

1. Who are some of your biggest influences, or your musical heroes?

That’s a long list! As far as musical heroes go I’d have to say Ben Nichols (of Lucero & Red 40), The White Buffalo, and Cory Branan. They’re styles, music, & delivery all resonated with me and embodied the thoughts of what I wanted to say with my own music.

Influences is a lot longer list though, my music taste is pretty wide, & I feel like I take influences from every style. I listened to a lot of the old country heroes growing up (Johnny Cash, Hank Sr, Ernest Tubb), but as I got older & started finding music on my own, I discovered many punk bands (Red 40, Black Flag, Jawbreaker), alt country artists (Ryan Bingham, American Aquarium, Old 97’s), and a few rappers (Coolio, Snoop Dogg, A$AP Rocky) that I listen to a lot.

2. Do you write your own music? Collaborate with others? Do you have a preference between the two?

Yes I do! When I write, it’s usually by myself. I’ve collaborated on a song or two, but the vast majority has been just me, I feel like it keeps it more honest.

3. What kinds of things do you write about? What inspires you?

I stick to writing about the stuff I know best; Girls, loss, and traveling. I’ve had a lot of people say I write a lot of sad songs, which is odd cause I’m a pretty happy person. I guess that’s my way of getting rid of those emotions.

4. How would you describe your style of music?

With all the different influences that have shaped it, my music is hard to fit into a set “genre”, especially the new LP I’m in the process of recording right now. There’s stripped down singer/songwriter tracks, there’s Rockabilly barn burners, & there’s even some straight up rock songs on there too.

If I had to try to describe as a whole, I’d say it’s real. Everything that I sing, I’ve lived, & I’m proud of that.

5. Do you have people that play with you? Do you have a band?

I’m pretty used to playing solo acoustic, but over the past couple months I’ve put together a three piece band, including myself. I’ve booking a lot more shows as a band, & I’m hoping to keep it up!

6. Do you produce your own music, or do you have a studio that works with you?

I have a studio I’ve been working with. I put out two singles with Living Oaks Studios, but the new album I’m working on right now I’ve been recording at The Afterdark Studio with Donny Hammonds. He’s a really talented guy who’s been playing music his whole life.

7. How can people listen to or purchase your music, and how could they learn about shows coming up, and other news concerning your music?

My music is available on Spotify, iTunes, Apple Music, & Amazon music. The new album will be available with all major music retailers when it releases as well.

As far as keeping up with my show dates and new music releases, I keep my instagram (@rocknroll.g), Facebook (Garrett Wheeler Music), & Twitter (@garrettcwheeler) updated.

8. Any closing remarks that you would like to share with your supporters/listeners?

I couldn’t do it without y’all! Thanks for the support, & kee supporting your local scene!

Zack Logan #featuredartistfriday 8.17.18

I’m especially thankful for this weeks featured artist.  Zack Logan has just recently released his first album “Raised by Wolves”.  If you have not heard this album yet, it is absolutely worth sitting down on your back porch, with a beer (preferably Shiner if you ask me), and listening to all the way through.  Several times in fact.  He has incredibly authentic lyrics, and his simply melodies a soul shaking.  I’m honored to have him on this page as I know he  (like others that have and will be on this page) is definitely going places.  Go check him out, and let us know what you think!
Here is his interview.
Background:
 
1. What’s your name(s)? How old Are you? Married? Kids? Where are you from? Where did you grow up?
 
Zack logan. Age 34. Married. 1 daughter
Born and raised in Newton, MS
 
2.  When/how were you introduced to music?
My parents both play piano. So I guess that’s probably the first music I remember. Also just singing at church.
 
3.  What were you doing before pursuing your music as a career?
 
Kind of a jack of all trades maintenance technician at an apartment complex.
 
4.  What made you decide to pursue your music career?
 
It has always been a dream to make a living from it.   I’ve been singing my whole life, and playing guitar since I was 15 or so. I think no matter what I’m doing professionally, I will always be in some kind of band, or playing in some bar on the weekends
 
On Your Music:
 
1.  Who are some of your biggest influences, or your musical heroes?
 
John Prine , Guy Clark, Robert Earle Keene.
 
2.  Do you write your own music? Collaborate with others?  Do you have a preference between the two?
 
So far I’ve written most of  it all. I collaborated on one song off my album. I like working at my own pace most of the time, which is usually a pretty good while.  I still do a few co-writes a month. It’s something I’m exploring a little more.
 
3.  What kinds of things do you write about?  What inspires you? 
 
I would say just basic human instincts. Love, hate, loss, religion, etc. Anything I can put a spin on.  Inspiration for music comes out of all places and times.  Sometimes I don’t realize what I’m writing about until I’m well into it.
 
4.  How would you describe your style of music?
 
I would say country/folk/Americana.
 
5.  Do you have people that play with you?  Do you have a band? Do you produce your own music, or do you have a studio that works with you?
 
My friends Austin Jenckes and Neil Mason produced my new record. “Raised by Wolves”. We recorded at Welcome to 1979 here in Nashville.
 
6.  How can people listen to or purchase your music, and how could they learn about shows coming up, and other news concerning your music?
 
My music is available on most streaming platforms, as well as iTunes and Apple Music.  You can follow me on most social media platforms as well to stay up to date on event and tour dates.  My website also has all my info. www.zacklogan.net
 
 
7. Any closing remarks that you would like to share with your supporters/listeners?
My fans mean everything to me. We are a lot like family! I’d like to thank everyone for the love and continued support.

Country Is

Image result for country music

When people ask me the question, “What kind of music do you like?”, I have found it pretty difficult to answer.  I want to say “Country”, but my fear is that they will confuse “my kind of country” with the version that Nashville is currently manufacturing.  Then I think to myself, “How do I define ‘my kind of country?'”.

I started this blog, in part, to answer this question.  Country is primarily influenced by roots music like bluegrass, folk, and blues.  However, there is a lot of good country that is fused with Rock and Roll, as well as other influences from across the country, and the world.  This is why I have chosen the name “Roots Revival”.  I believe that there is currently a revival happening that is taking country (as well as other roots genres) back to the roots.

Currently, there are writers in Nashville putting their heart and soul into writing music for other people.  These writers are taking jobs at bars, construction companies, and non-profit organizations, because being a writer simply does not pay the bills.  The performer, on the other hand, can afford the most expensive pair of boots on music row. But country music has traded their Cowboy hat for a brand-name, flat-bill, ball cap, and their boots for a new pair of Yeezy’s every other day.

Image result for bro countryNow, I’m not saying that in order to be Country, you have to be a cowboy; But one of the most important aspects of Country music (since Hank Williams) has been authenticity.  Singing someone else’s songs is one thing (think Willie Nelson singing Frank Sinatra), but using someone else’s songs as a means to an end is a whole different ball game.  Don’t even get me started on how many of the songs sound like they are the EXACT same song.

I love what comedian Bo Burnham says about today’s Country music: “It’s pandering.”

Image result for bo burnhamTo the teenage girls, it’s a tall handsome man dancing around on stage, singing about an ideal date night that if any average Joe tried to pull-off would be considered creepy as hell.  For guys it’s the constant referencing beer, farm party’s, trucks, small towns, and much more stereotypical country themes.

If it’s not pandering then its posing.  There a many artists who belong in a completely different genre, but they go on tour as a “country artist” and people buy it because of the attractiveness of the show, or artist[s].  Thanks a lot Garth Brooks.

What I’m seeking in music is the truth.  I want to know I’m not alone in the world.  Roger Miller’s “Where Have All the Average People Gone” is one of my favorites because of how it speaks to me personally.  In this song he says “country folks all say I’m citified”.  This is a big deal, because He is being honest that there are aspects of him as a person that people view as not country.  While he begins with “The people in this city call me country, because of how I walk and talk and smile.”: He is revealing himself by showing the diversity of his character.  This is authenticity at its finest.

 

I truly believe that the best definition of “Country” can be found in the lyrics of Tom T. Hall’s “Country Is”.  In this song, he sings that, “Country is what you make it. Country is all in your mind.”  Throughout the song, Hall brings up different ideas of what he believes country is.  His point is that country is personal.  I don’t agree with everything he says in the song, but I do agree that country is a fluid word.  Country is “twin fiddles and a steel guitar”, but it’s so much more.  Country is authentic expression of true emotion that is prevalent among hard working people everywhere.  High class or low class.  Black or white.  Christian or Atheist.  Country was meant for everyone.  There is no mold.  It’s raw, and reckless.

So to answer the question.  I like whatever kind of music speaks to me.  I don’t relate to factory made, hip-hop beat, stadium packing, bro country; and I know there are many others that agree.  So here’s to the “Roots Revival”!

-Locker

 

 

 

 

 

Nick Sizemore #featuredartistfriday 8.10.18

A big thank you to Nick Sizemore, for taking the time to fill out our interview.  Thanks also to Nick and many others who have spent time serving their country.  Nick has grown up swimming in country music gold.  If you didn’t notice, he actually plays his guitar upside down.  When I asked him the story behind his way of playing, he told me that his Father taught him to play, but being left-handed, he flipped the guitar over and has played that way ever since.  Doesn’t get more outlaw than Nick, who’s mantra is #tilltheybleed, referring to a time when he was playing guitar, cut his fingers on the strings, and painted the front of his guitar with blood.  It’s pretty bad ass.  Check out his pictures, and videos on Instagram @nsizemusic.   He’s got a great voice, and we are excited for the new album he is currently working on “Nick Sizemore and the Outlaw Sound”.

Background:

 
1. What’s your name(s)? How old Are you? Married? Kids? Where are you from? Where did you grow up?
Nick Sizemore, of central Illinois
 
2.  When/how were you introduced to music?
Growing up my family listened to a lot of old music. Records from the 50’s and 60’s were played constantly.  I remember riding in my dad’s old truck and him rewinding tapes so I could hear solos over again.
 
3.  What were you doing before pursuing your music as a career?
I spent 4 years in the United States Marine Corps as a rifleman, and deployed to Afghanistan, played a lot In the barracks, and it just kind of grew from there.
4.  What made you decide to pursue your music career?
Life is too short to do anything other than exactly what you want. It’s a lot easier to struggle and love what you’re doing, than to struggle and hate your job
 
On Your Music:
 
1.  Who are some of your biggest influences, or your musical heroes?
Waylon Jennings for sure, George Jones, Hank Williams Sr., Whitey Morgan and the 78’s, Ray price, Buck Owens, I could go on forever.
 
2.  Do you write your own music? Collaborate with others?  Do you have a preference between the two?
I do both, usually collaborate for some shows, but I really enjoy writing my own music. Willie Nelson once said “If you can’t write it in ten minutes, it doesn’t need to come out”. I’ve been pretty religious about not spending more than l ten minutes on one song. I think it forces you to grow.
 
3.  What kinds of things do you write about?  What inspires you? 
I write about all types of things, but they’re usually darker, substance abuse, rejection,murder, things that happen to people they don’t much want on the radio.
 
4.  How would you describe your style of music?
It takes a lot of shapes, maybe Outlaw Country or Americana
 
5.  Do you have people that play with you?  Do you have a band?
I do alot of solo shows, but for bigger venues, I have a go to team filled with some extremely talented musicians.
6.  Do you produce your own music, or do you have a studio that works with you?
We’re currently in the process of recording my first album for “Nick Sizemore and the Outlaw Sound”, but I’ve got two good friends with producing experience helping me along the way,
7.  How can people listen to or purchase your music, and how could they learn about shows coming up, and other news concerning your music?
You can follow me @nsizemusic on Instagram, Nick Sizemore and the Outlaw Sound on Facebook
8. Any closing remarks that you would like to share with your supporters/listeners?
Keep supporting good music, there’s alot coming out, you just have to dig a little.